Please Mind The Gap

Is it just me, or is it getting colder? After this ridiculously wet summer, it already seems to be autumn. About time we start to sort out some of the remaining insulation and heating issues our house still haves.

We have already insulated under our most of our ground floor (you can read about that here),

Underfloor Insulation

we’ve added extra insulation in the loft, replaced some windows and sealed the gaps around the remaining existing windows.

Expanding Foam Filler Around Window

We have also replaced the living room fireplace.

Edwardian Fireplace After

You can read about our new fireplace here.

One of the main areas still in need of an upgrade, is the gap between the skirting and floor boards. Although this isn’t the most exciting work ever, it actually pays for itself within about a year.

As you already know, we removed most of our carpets even before moving in.

Remove Smell Of Urine

You can read more about how disgusting they were here.  Although this really didn’t do much for our heating bills – if you add up all the gaps between the skirting and floor, the area adds up to about the area of a small window – it was really necessary.

Initially, we tried caulking the gaps between the skirting and floorboards, but it turned out to be rather messy, as the gaps were all different sizes, sometimes they were too large and the caulk would fall through to the cellar beneath. Caulk also doesn’t tolerate much movement, so that over time it would rip and get dirty.

After having our floors sanded and varnished, we didn’t want to risk messing them up again with caulk, so we decided to use some window sealing tape to fill the gaps.

The tape we used is called weatherstrip and seals gaps from 2-8 mm. Make sure the tape is at least as thick as the gap you are looking to fill, as it will automatically expand to the thickness of the joint once it is in place.

Filling Gap Between Skirting and Floorboard

We opted for black tape, so that it wouldn’t be visible once in the gap.

It takes just minutes to complete a room, as all you have to do it push it into place with a stripping knife. The tape then automatically expands to the thickness of the space and, because the tape has expanded, it stays firmly in place.

Filling Gap Between Skirting And Floorboard

We should probably point out, that there are specialist tapes available for this job, but we found that this cheaper option works really well. According to the Energy Saving Trust, filling the gap between skirting and floor boards will save around £20 a year in heating costs.

And here is the filled gap.

Gap Between Skirting And Floor

You can just about make out the tape. It’s pretty much invisible, unless you lie on the floor and stare at the skirting board that is!

19 thoughts on “Please Mind The Gap

  1. Pingback: Easy Guite To Installing Loft Insulation

  2. This is so useful thanks! I am in the same situation in my house. Quick question did you remove the self seal for the strip when placing it? I wondered whether the strip just gets inserted or remove the self seal. Many thanks
    Ann

    • Glad we could help, Ann! Yes, we removed the seal – we found that it helped the strip stay in place better where the gaps were slightly larger.
      Cx

  3. I have filled my gaps between skirt and floor with strip wood, glued in place and painted. Slow but doesn’t leave a visible gap. Also been filling the gaps between floorboards with slithers. All dry time consuming but has a superior finish aesthetically.

  4. Very useful advice, thank you. Can you recommend anything for large gaps between floor and skirting board (apprx 1.5 inches)? It is a very old house and the floors and floor boards are no longer particular even.

    All the best

    Kirsty

    • You’re welcome, Kirsty! 1.5 inches is a lot! We like using the weatherstrip because our floors aren’t even either and it expands to the different levels. I don’t think it would work on such large gaps though. The previous commenter, Rick, filled the gaps with strip wood. Maybe that would be an option.
      Good luck!
      Cx

  5. Christine,
    this looks like a good idea! we have gaps under our skirting boards, 0 to 20mm!!! and SLUGS are getting into our house faster than Nazi’s into poland! I’ve not come accross this tape before, after your remove the seal, how did you slide the tape into the tight gaps with out it sticking to the floor before you got it under the skirting?

    Cheers,

    Jared.

    • Thanks, Jared! When squashing the tape into the gaps, we removed the seal as we went – basically pushing in the tape and pulling away the seal as we worked our way along the skirting board. The tape also isn’t overly sticky, so if it does stick somewhere that it shouldn’t it’s not a problem to remove. When the tape expands in the joint, it stays there on it’s own – the stickyness is just a little extra help.
      Good luck keeping the slugs out – I can’t imagine anything worse!!
      Cx

  6. Great article as I have similar draught issue – I just wondered please which shop did you purchase your weatherstrip tape in? – many thanks, Michael

    • Thanks, Michael! I think we picked up the weather strip at B&Q, but you should be able to pick it up at any DIY store – it’s really not hard to get hold of.
      Good luck with your draught proofing!
      Cx

  7. Hi. Love your website! We are thinking about having an engineered wood floor laying in our lounge BUT hate, hate, hate the beading that is attached for expansion . We have very deep old skirting boards and do not really want to take them off first and then place them back when the floor is fitted. Have you any ideas for a different type of beading to attach to the skirting boards that make it look like part of the original skirting board. I’ve looked at loads of websites but nothing is just right. Am I too fussy? XXXX

    • Thanks, Elaine! I completely agree with you about the beading! I was sooo happy when we ripped up the laminate flooring in our house and could remove the beading that we had! As annoying as it is, I can’t really think of an option other than removing and then reattaching the skirting. When laying an engineered floor, you are always going to have a gap that needs covering somehow. If it’s not possible to remove the skirting, maybe you could choose some beading that’s then painted the same colour as your skirting so that it blends in and looks like it’s just skirting?
      Sorry we couldn’t be more help!
      Cx

  8. Would this be rodent proof? Just noticed some mice in our rental house as weather cools down. House is an old queenslander…it has many big gaps between floor and skirting. Thinking of doing this method.

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